Upgrade ESXi from 5.0 to 5.1 without vCenter or Update Manager

Following the idea that ESXi can be updated without vCenter or Update Manager, I upgraded my ESXi from 5.0 to 5.1. As I don’t own a vCenter, I did it using the console and esxcli.
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Monitor VMware vSphere from OpenBSD using the Perl SDK

Last time, I had a look at how to monitor VMware vSphere from FreeBSD using the Perl SDK. Quite simple using the ports!

Believe it or not, installing and running the VMware vSphere Perl SDK on OpenBSD is as simple as breathing. Here’s the POC.

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Quick tour of the Veeam ONE 6 for VMware and Hyper-V

Part of my daily job is checking clients infrastructure health. Most of them have VMware vSphere, some have Hyper-V. I use a home-developed set of tools to gather, compute and report performance and health data and metrics. Quoting Veeam ONE for VMware and Hyper-V homepage: “(…) Veeam ONE is a single solution for powerful and easy-to-use monitoring and reporting for VMware and Hyper-V. It provides complete visibility of the virtual infrastructure and affordably delivers the capabilities that matter most to virtualization administrators”. Read the official homepage for more information.

Here I’m going to have a quick look at what Veeam ONE 6 does, how and if it’s worth it.

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Managing ESXi 5 VM from the command line

I only have one physical machine and my vSphere client is installed on a Windows XP virtual machine. If, for some reason, that VM is not usable, I need a way to manage my VM from the ESXi. Here’s a few reminders on commands to use to manage VM from the VMware ESXi v5 command line.

Every command is used from the ESXi itself, via a remote SSH connexion. Those could also be run from a distant machine where the vSphere Command-Line Interface (vCLI) has been installed.

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